The Complete Entertainment

The official site of the studio that created Wallace, the hapless yet well-meaning, cheese-loving inventor, and Gromit, his faithful canine companion, is a treasure trove of video clips (click on Show Reel) and links to character sites including www.wandg.com, where you can get a behind-the-scenes look at the making of Wallace & Gromit’s first feature-length movie.

This well-organized, easy-to-search compendium of book reviews—last we checked, there were 1,430 titles covered—includes editor’s picks and bestseller lists by year. The site links to (and vets) dozens of literary weblogs, from Bookninja to Mobylives to its own Literary Saloon. The Review Index lets you search for books by author or title, genre or nationality; you can read the site’s own review or click to read reviews published elsewhere.

A rich, expansive resource for music fans more into Handel than hip-hop, Opus 1 provides information on classical music concerts, festivals and opera in dozens of cities across the globe. You can browse by city and calendar month, or try the Venue Finder. Listings include program information and links to where to buy tickets.

Got a fabulous digital music collection, but don’t like breaking the law to share it? This peer-to-peer service is legal, because listeners don’t actually download any music. Instead, they stream music on their computers that is webcast over the Internet by other members. (The company does have to pay webcasting royalties to copyright holders, and charges some user fees to cover them.) The offerings are listed in the traditional peer-to-peer way, noting artist, album, song title—in this case, the one currently playing—and source. Basic service is free, but limited to 30 minutes of listening a day. For $5 a month ($48 if you pre-pay for the year) you get unlimited listening time and can save up to 10 hours of programming for listening later. Premier members can also download the IMDJ application and create up to five different channels. Honorable mention: Underheard.org, which makes independent and community radio available for streaming or downloading to your portable audio player.

An ambitious guide to what’s on television. The All Shows index is organized by category (Comedy, Drama, Children’s Talk, Soaps, Reality, Sci-Fi and so on); browse from A to Z or by decade. You’ll find everything from the Life and Times of Juniper Lee to The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin. But of the 14,000 shows in the database, only 2,500 of them have content that’s fully fleshed out, so the idea is to have fans help fill in the rest. Register for a free account to write (or edit) plot summaries and episode recaps, contribute trivia tidbits or write reviews. (The website’s editors review every submission before it is posted.) The News page reports tidbits like Patrick Stewart’s heart-attack scare and Megan Mullally’s talk show deal. For a snarkier take on what’s on the tube, there’s always televisionwithoutpity.com

The Web’s best source of talk radio for your iPod. Unlike other sites that offer podcasts for downloading, such as podcastalley.com and ipodder.org (two other good sources in their own right), Podcast Bunker evaluates each feed for audio quality and content and only lists the best stuff. Click the Quick Guide for the full list of recommended programs, plus 30-second previews.

This well-organized, easy-to-search compendium of book reviews—last we checked, there were 1,430 titles covered—includes editor’s picks and bestseller lists by year. The site links to (and vets) dozens of literary weblogs, from Bookninja to Mobylives to its own Literary Saloon. The Review Index lets you search for books by author or title, genre or nationality; you can read the site’s own review or click to read reviews published elsewhere.

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